FRAGONARD IN LOVE. SUITOR AND LIBERTINE @ Musée du Luxembourg

Below are a selection of the drawings a Fragonard exhibit from a 2016 show. Had a ball with all the fabulous and fashionable older Parisian set at this quaint little museum right inside the Luxembourg Garden.

“Jean-Honoré Fragonard was a French painter and printmaker whose late Rococo manner was distinguished by remarkable facility, exuberance, and hedonism.Wikipedia
Born: April 5, 1732, Grasse, France
Died:
August 22, 1806, Paris, France

 

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Ipad Drawings by James Lipovac

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Adrian Piper in All the World’s Futures, La Biennale di Venezia, 2015

by James Lipovac
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I was recently bowled over by the powerful work of Adrian Piper currently on display in Venice.  A conceptual artist with a PhD in philosophy from Harvard, Piper was born in New York City and works out of Berlin. Her art opens eyes and seeks to build bridges between people. Last week at the Biennale, she received the Golden Lion for best artist for her efforts.

Among the group of pieces is an interactive installation titled “Rules of the Game” which called on viewers to sign life-long contracts at three separate desks, with one of the three rules:

I will always be too expensive to buy

I will always mean what I say

I will always do what I say I am going to do

tooexpensive

everything

 

 

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In another room, objects were covered with the words “everything will be taken away” and hung next to a giant photo of the Nazis at their Degenerate Art Show. I was taken, as is often the case, by the way the work effected the audience, or didn’t. You can see in the photo at the top of the post, viewers standing around blankly, while the man on the right talked loudly on his cellphone for the entire time I was viewing at the work. Her ominous prediction sees so much more probable in this setting. After a week of contemplating the theme of All the World’s Futures, I found Piper’s directness on the topic hard to describe as anything less than courageous and superb.

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Adrian Ghenie @ the Romania Pavilion, La Biennale di Venezia, 2015

by James Lipovac DSC03729

This image of a giant Venus Fly trap dwarfing a man in a trench coat standing underneath a menacingly heavy sky was a stand-out at Ghenie’s speculator painting performance at the 56th La Biennale di Venezia in the Romanian Pavilion.

I first came across Adrian Ghenie’s work at Pace in New York in March of 2013. A painter friend of mine encourage me to check out the show. The strength of the work is Ghenie’s ability to harmonize elements of abstract figuration and more realistic interpretations all in the same canvas.

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I was excited to see what a fellow painter would do given the chance to represent their own nation, in this case, Romania. In his show “Darwin’s Room” Ghenie uses Darwin, evolution, and survival as themes for his grand brushwork and sheets of oil. He switches between and harmonizes intimate slow moments of finessed detail, larges areas of squeegeed paint, and thick sections of impasto.

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Chiharu Shiota “The Key in the Hand” @ the Japan Pavilion, La Biennale da Venezia 2015

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Chiharu Shiota’s  “The Key in the Hand” installation is a bold vision of the the dark beauty of the human life lived. This Berlin-based artist was born in Osaka Prefecture in 1972.

Curator, Hitoshi Nakano- “After being confronted with the deaths of several intimate friends and family in recent years, Shiota has converted these experiences into the lingua franca of pure and sublime art without averting her eyes from the reality that all human beings must face “life” and “death” but that each of us must do so individually. “


Joana Vasconcelos for Portugal – Venice Biennale 2013

By Lauren Gidwitz
originally published 6.30.2013 for Thred Projects

Rather than join the crowds, and take a normative place in a land-locked pavilion, Portugal decided to choose and artist who reflected, with beautiful nuance and subtlety, on her own identity as a citizen of a country largely dependent on the ocean. They chose well. The floating effervescent world of Joana Vasconcelos habituated itself on Praia, a tubby ferryboat from Lisbon, and spent the Biennale moving through the watery surroundings of the city. The outer shell was covered with tiles made in Portugal, depicting the city of Lisbon in blue on a white background. At key moments the floating pavilion would pull up to a pier and welcome wary and excited visitors onto the deck’s lounge and down into its belly.

Upon entrance into the lower level, we were enveloped into an environment akin to a visceral representation of the interior of the human body, as well as the bioluminescent underbelly of the deep ocean, complete with the sounds of the lapping waves from the outside. Our eyes were lit by a subtle harmony of blues vibrating underneath swirls of slow dimming and brightening LED lights in cadence with our breathing; bulbous forms enveloped by knit yarn and rows of tassels, and long ropey tendrils snaked out and into our physical space. A series of questions nagged at the back of my mind… was it pushing into our bodily space? Was it allowing us in? Or were we the intruders in this habitat? Through its intervention on the exterior and interior of the boat, bringing to mind the outside and inside of the body, and the surface and depths of the ocean, as well as integration of both technology and handicraft, the experience, though tranquil, required active and mindful engagement from its visitors.

It was a beautiful reminder of the unseen beauty of the darkest depths of our ocean, the strong cultural connection and interdependence with the coastal country of Portugal, the future of Venice as it slowly sinks into the depths of the ocean, and the vital and beautiful ecological role it plays in all of our lives. In both content and formal execution, this is the most eloquent political work I have come across in a long time. Brava.

Joana Vasconcelos, Portugal, Venice Biennale 2013

Joana Vasconcelos, Portugal, Venice Biennale 2013

Joana Vasconcelos, Portugal, Venice Biennale 2013

Joana Vasconcelos, Portugal, Venice Biennale 2013

Joana Vasconcelos, Portugal, Venice Biennale 2013

Joana Vasconcelos, Portugal, Venice Biennale 2013

Joana Vasconcelos, Portgual, Venice Biennale 2013

Joana Vasconcelos, Portgual, Venice Biennale 2013


Joan Jonas to Represent US in 2015 Venice Biennale

Joan Jonas, Organic Honey's Vertical Roll

Joan Jonas, Organic Honey’s Vertical Roll, Ace Gallery, Los Angeles, 1972. Photo by Roberta NeimanJoan Jonas, The Shape, the Scent, the Feel of Things

Joan Jonas, The Shape, the Scent, the Feel of Things, performance at Dia Beacon, 2005.  Photo by Paula CourtJoan Jonas, Organic Honey's Vertical Roll

Joan Jonas, Organic Honey’s Vertical Roll, Musee Galliera, Paris, 1972/1973.Joan Jonas, Mirror Piece

oan Jonas, Mirror Piece, performance at Annadale on Hudson, 1969.  Photo by Joan JonasJoan Jonas, Organic Honey's Vertical Roll

Joan Jonas, Organic Honey’s Vertical Roll, Musee Galliera, Paris, 1972/1973.  Photo by Beatrice Helligers

Joan Jonas has been a tenured visual arts professor at MIT for the past 15 years, and is currently Professor Emerita in the MIT Program in Art, Culture, and Technology (ACT). Curated by Paul C. Ha, Director of the MIT List Visual Arts Center and commissioner for the project; and Ute Meta Bauer, currently the Director of the Centre for Contemporary Art (CCA) at the Nanyang Technological University in Singapore and previously the Founding Director of the Program in Art, Culture, and Technology (ACT) at MIT, Jonas’s installation for the U.S. Pavilion will be an exceptional moment in her longstanding relationship with MIT.

For the five galleries of the U.S. Pavilion, Joan Jonas will conceive a new complex of works, creating a multilayered ambience, incorporating video, drawings, objects, and sound. Literature has always been an inspiration and source for Jonas, and the project for Venice will extend her investigation into the work of Halldór Laxness and his writing on the spiritual aspects of nature, but will focus on other literary sources.

The List is renowned for presenting groundbreaking contemporary artwork and has always served as a creative laboratory where artists are free to experiment—–a leadership position that has been affirmed by the Center’s selection as the commissioning institution for the U.S. Pavilion for the third time in the past 15 years, having organized the Pavilions by Fred Wilson in 2003 and Ann Hamilton in 1999.

“Joan’s voice and vision have been powerful forces in contemporary art for five decades, and I am thrilled that we will present her latest work in Venice, one of the most iconic forums for the presentation of cutting-edge artwork,” said Paul Ha, Director of the MIT List Visual Arts Center. “Joan’s selection is not only an acknowledgement of her outstanding contributions to the art world thus far, but also an investment in the innovative promise of her future work.”

Jonas has continued to work with a multimedia approach throughout her career, being one of the first artists to explore the potential of the video camera as a tool for image-making and the TV monitor as a sculptural object. At the same time, Jonas experimented in her performances with incorporating the body into the visual field. Her installations and performances bring these components together through drawing, props, and objects to create works reflecting her research in relation to space, narrative, or storytelling, and materials as they are altered through various technologies such as the mirror, video, and distance. In Venice, she will work with these diverse aspects of her practice to create five distinct rooms, with common themes unifying and resonating in the entire space, relating to the present condition of the world in poetic terms.

Jonas’s work developed out of her art history studies and sculptural practice, and expanded to performance and film in the 1960s through her involvement with the New York avant-garde scene. Her work has had a significant influence on contemporary art to date, as she has continued to be a major figure in the fields of performance and video art throughout the past five decades.

In conjunction with the presentation of her new work at the U.S. Pavilion, the List will present several of Jonas’s most significant, single-channel video works, selected from her 40-year career, in an exhibition in the List’s Bakalar Gallery from April 7 through July 5, 2015. The intimate exhibition will provide important background and context for Jonas’s new work on view simultaneously in Venice, and will share with local audiences the pivotal videos and performances that led to the artist’s selection as the U.S. representative for the 2015 Venice Biennale.

“As I know from working with Joan as both a curator and educator, one does not only see her work, one experiences it. Her performances make a lasting impression, and her ability to work with spaces in a sensual way will most certainly turn a visit to the U.S. Pavilion in Venice into a profound encounter,” said Ute Meta Bauer, Director of the Centre for Contemporary Art at the Nanyang Technological University, Singapore.

“We are especially proud to be presenting an MIT professor as the representative artist for the U.S. at the Venice Biennale,” said Philip S. Khoury, Ford International Professor of History and Associate Provost, who oversees the arts at MIT. “Joan’s fearlessly experimental work is emblematic of MIT and the List’s mission to foster the creation of intellectually investigative, challenging artwork, and we have no doubt that her installation for the U.S. Pavilion will push new boundaries and captivate audiences in ways that were previously unimaginable.”

To learn more about Joan Jonas and the U.S. Pavilion, please visit http://joanjonasvenice2015.com